Wood & Randall has always strived to stay ahead of the competition when it comes to technology.  Well, we can’t ignore the new social media craze.  Although some law firms are using these networks, most people are still confused about what it’s all about.  The following is a short synopsis for those interested:    Twitter:  This is a free microblogging site.  It’s been around for a few years, but its popularity recently has exploded.  It asks a simple question:  What are you doing?  Twitterers can only use 140 characters to answer that question.  Responses are short and to the point.  Twitter has a philosophy to pay it forward.  Law firms are  using Twitter, and it’s a great way to communicate with a fellow reporter.  It’s also a great way to give advice or to pass on helpful information.  It’s probably not a place to sell a service or a product. Facebook:   Facebook is a social networking website intended to connect friends, family, and business associates. It is the largest of the networking sites.  Facebook is extremely active in the reporting and attorney population.  The rule of thumb on Facebook is that if you would not want it on a billboard that you should not post it on Facebook.  Some suggest that you have a personal Facebook page for your family and friends and then have a separate company or firm page that would just be for clients and business associates. LinkedIn:  This site is more business oriented and is actually better than a resume.  It asks a simple question:  What are you working on?  This site is focused on business.  It should be noted that executives from every Fortune 500 company at the board level are represented on the site.  LinkedIn sends out weekly updates informing your contacts what you are working on, who you have connected to, etc.  It’s a great way to stay “top of mind.” MyLegal.com:   This is a professional social network exclusively for litigation support professionals.  It’s the first one of its kind.  This site includes forums, blogs, industry news, and it even has great articles.  Members have the ability to learn about technology, share experiences, and to build relationships.  Visitors to the site will also have access to interviews with noted leaders in litigation support and how-to videos.    In closing, consider using these sites to build and maintain relationships.  Just assess your goals, decide which site is best for you, create your profile and connect with others.  It may be very rewarding and even profitable.